Newsletter

Charlie’s Mid September Newsletter

Growing Flowering Vines Webinar, Stunning Sedum, Get Growing with Garlic, and Climbing Hydrangea Vine

mandevilla vineAs I’ve been driving around going to various talks and meetings, I’ve been noticing all the different annual and perennial flowering vines in bloom. I’ve developed an eye for looking out for flowering vines because I’m doing a webinar on the subject on October 7th, 2021 and I’m looking for photos. What strikes me is the rampant growth by September on some vines and the masses of flowers on others, especially the annual vines. It inspires me to grow more vines and to talk about them in the webinar. I talk more about this webinar below.

A perennial that always shines in fall is sedum or stone crop. There are two versions of sedum. One creeps along the ground and has colorful leaves and flowers. The other is 1- to 20- feet tall and features masses of flowers in fall. I talk about these sedum in the landscape and how to grow them best in this newsletter.

pestoIt’s a little early yet to plant garlic, but not too early to talk about getting ready. I love growing garlic because we plant in mid-October, when the garden work load has lessened. The crop is easy, reliable and we save the best bulbs each year to replant, so it’s free! I talk about varieties of garlic, planting and growing them with some tips in this newsletter.

I mentioned about my Growing Flowering Vines Webinar that’s coming up in October. Well to get you more excited, I’m featuring one of the vines I’ll be talking about in the webinar. Climbing hydrangea is a favorite woody vine because it offers four seasons of visual interest. It produces flowers in spring and summer, fall foliage color and peeling, cinnamon colored bark in winter. It’s a great plant to cover a wall, fence or pergola. I talk more about growing it here.

Even though the weather is still warm, the days are shorter and I know we’re into fall. That’s okay. It’s been a good summer.

Until next time, I’ll be seeing you in the garden.

Charlie

Charlie & Sharon


Where to Find Charlie:(podcasts, TV and in-person)


NEW: Growing Flowering Vines Webinar

trumpet vineFlowering vines is one of the categories of plants that gardeners love, especially when they are in full flower and they look great. But I think many people are intimidated trying to grow them. That shouldn’t be the case. Many annual, perennial and woody flowering perennial vines grow easily in the garden if you choose the right ones for your location and plant them in the right spot. That’s where I come in.

To help gardeners filter through the various types of vines and choose the best annuals, perennials and woody vines for their location, I’ve put together this Growing Flowering Vines Webinar.

clematisGrowing Flowering Vines Webinar will take place on Thursday, October 7th, 2021 at 7 pm Eastern time. But you don’t have to be present to watch the webinar. Everyone who signs up will get a recording of the webinar a few days later. Of course, if you can come to the live event you can ask questions in real time.

sweet peasDuring the webinar I’ll cover some of the most popular and beautiful flowering vines, such as mandevilla, climbing honeysuckle, cypress vine, cup and saucer vine, sweet peas, clematis, climbing hydrangea, and trumpet vine, and talk about where and how to grow each type so they will thrive. I’ll also spend some time talking about how vines grow. I’ll cover the different ways flowering vines attach themselves to a fence, trellis, wall or building and offer important reminders about protecting your buildings from over zealous climbing vines.

The webinar will also cover how to grow and prune these vines, good locations and companion plants to grow along with each one. Of course, there will be time at the end for your questions. I’ll also solicit questions before the webinar so I can be sure to cover topics that interest you in the webinar.

So, check out more information about the Growing Flowering Vines Webinar on October 7th, 2021 on my website.

Go here to learn more about the Growing Flowering Vines Webinar

How to Grow: Sedum
sedumSedums, or stonecrop, are great plants for a sunny, dry location offering interesting foliage colors and flowers from summer through fall. There are basically two types of sedums that gardeners can grow. The creeping sedum is a low growing, ground cover that often has colorful leaves and small flowers in summer. The upright sedum grows 1+ feet tall and flowers in fall with pink colored blooms. There are a number of different varieties of each type.

sedum‘Dragon’s Blood’ sedum is a colorful creeping type. Growing only 6 inches tall, the succulent green leaves are edged in dark cranberry and covered with vivid red, starry flowers in late summer. The leaves turn a strong, red color in fall. It’s a great plant for a rock garden or the edge of a perennial flower border. ‘Blue Spruce’ sedum has attractive blue-green leaves on a low growing, creeping plant. Bright yellow flowers emerge in early summer to compliment the blue-green foliage. It’s another beautiful plant for a border garden. ‘Neon’ sedum is an upright selection. It grows 18-inches tall with bright, pink colored flowers in late summer. A larger version is ‘Autumn Joy’. This classic upright sedum has thick, green foliage and bright pink flowers on 2-foot tall plants. There are even tall versions with burgundy colored leaves and darker pink, colored flowers.

sedumSedums grow well in full to part sun on well-drained soil. We’ve learned that the hard way when we planted them on poorly drained soil and the plants rotted. Once you find a good spot for them, they will spread and be a delight for years. Creeping sedums are called stone crop for a reason. They like to creep along rock gardens filled with stony, well-drained soils. We have ours on the edge of a raised garden lined in stone and they seem very happy. Even if they sometime die back in winter, sedums often will recover and fill back in quickly.

Tall sedums don’t spread as much, but stay in a clump form. They also like the same sun and soil conditions. In fact, adding too much fertility to their soil can cause them to flop over in fall. We’ve used cages, or just planted them near other taller perennials, to keep them upright. You can also pinch the growth points in early summer to get them to bush out.

Both types of sedum can be divided after a few years. This is helpful to move around creeping types in the garden to fill in blank spaces. Dividing also helps the upright types flop less and be more vigorous. Divide sedum in spring so they have plenty of time to recover and flower in summer and fall. 

Learn more about growing sedum here

American Meadows

How to Grow: Garlic
garlicGarlic is one of those vegetables that I think should be planted more in home gardens, especially with beginners. That’s because garlic is so easy to grow, is planted when you’re not as busy in the garden and reliably produces bulbs each year.

Plant garlic around the time you’d plant daffodils and tulips in your garden. In our zone 5 climate, that’s mid-October. The warmer the climate, the later in the year you can plant. Fall planting allows the bulbs to set roots and grow early in spring resulting in large bulbs. I find planting in raised beds is best. The only time my garlic didn’t make it through the winter is when it was planted on poorly drained soil. Raised beds help with water drainage and allow the bulbs to expand quickly in spring. Plant in a full sun location and amend the soil with compost and a small handful of organic,  5-5-5 fertilizer. 

garlic plantsThe night before planting, break apart the bulbs into cloves and let them sit out over night. The flat bottom of the clove will callus over, helping rooting. Plant cloves, pointy side up in rows, spacing the cloves 6-inches apart and 3- to 6-inches deep. water well and cover with 6- to 12-inches of hay, straw, chopped leaves, untreated grass clippings or wood chips. This will keep the soil cool and prevent sprouting in fall. Also, it protects the bulbs in winter from freezing and thawing.

In spring, remove the mulch when the cloves sprout, add a little more fertilizer and keep well watered and weeded. Harvest in early summer once the bottom leaves yellow. Harvest scapes when they form to eat or to just help produce a bigger bulb.

garlic scapesThere are many varieties of garlic. Don’t buy garlic in the store because it’s mostly adapted to growing in California. Even if you live out West, select varieties adapted to your region from reputable growers. Hardneck varieties form scapes or curly-cues in early summer that are edible. Remove then when they start to curl. Hardneck varieties have fewer, but larger cloves. Some varieties include ‘Red Russian’, ‘Music’, and ‘Persian Star’.

Softneck varieties have supple leaves that can be braided after harvest. They produce more cloves than hardneck types, but the cloves are smaller. Softneck varieties tend to be hardier than hardnecks in cold climates. Some varieties to look for include ‘New York White’ and ‘Inchelium Red’.

Another fun part of growing garlic is you can save some bulbs each year to grow again in your garden in fall. In this way, you’ll develop your own variety that’s adapted to your local weather and soil. However, only save bulbs that are disease-free.  

Learn more about garlic here

In Our Garden: Climbing Hydrangea

climbing hydrangeaIn my upcoming Webinar, Growing Flowering Vines, I’ll be talking about a wide variety of vines to grow in your landscape. I wanted to highlight one of those vines here.

Climbing hydrangea or Hydrangea petiolaris, is a woody, climbing vine that has four seasons of interest. It produces flat, white flowers in late spring and early summer. During summer it has attractive dark, green leaves that turn golden colored in fall. In winter, once the leaves drop, the exfoliating, cinnamon colored bark adds beauty, especially when contrasted with snow in colder climates.

climbing hydrangeaClimbing hydrangea is hardy in zones 5 to 8. It grows best in full to part sun. It’s unusual, in that it will flower well in shady spots and I often see it planted on the North-side of houses for that reason. It likes fertile, well-drained soil and benefits from annual additions of compost. It’s a slow grower the first few years. But once established, it will grow strong. If supported, it will grow up to 50 feet tall over time. It can be kept shorter with annual pruning after flowering.

The key with growing climbing hydrangea is giving it adequate support. It grows into a large, woody vine, so needs a strong wooden or metal structure to support it. It has hold fasts that attach to walls and buildings to naturally climb. However, this can damage siding over time. So it’s best to erect a sturdy trellis or let it grow on stone or brick surfaces. It aslo grows well on old tree stumps.

While most varieties have white flowers and green leaves, ‘Miranda’ is a variegated leaf variety with cream and green colored foliage and white flowers. 

Learn more about climbing hydrangea here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gardening with Charlie · 105 Pond Ln · North Ferrisburgh, VT 05473 · USA

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Gardening with Charlie · 105 Pond Ln · North Ferrisburgh, VT 05473 · USA

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Charlie Nardozzi via gmail.mcsv.net 

10:10 AM (8 hours ago)
to me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Charlie’s Late June Newsletter

 

Robust Rudbeckia, Nothing Better Than Blueberries, Summer Sweet Shrubs and My Fig Article

cherriesWe have officially hit summer. While the calendar says end of June, our garden is already picking up color from later blooming perennials. One of them is the rudbeckia. They start blooming mid summer and continue right until frost. The number and types of rudbeckias or black eyed Susans out there has increased so you can grow short ones, tall ones, all yellow ones and some with burnt red colored petals. Learn all about rudbeckia in this newsletter.

Another summer plant that’s just starting to show color is one of our fruit bushes. Blueberries will be rounding into form soon and it looks like we’ve got a good crop coming. Of course, we’re not the only ones that love blueberries, so in this newsletter I’ll not only talk about varieties and growing these shrubs but also ways to protect them from birds. Blueberry fields forever!

Most flowering shrubs are finished for the season, but some haven’t even started yet. Summersweet, pepperbush or Clethra is a sun to part shade loving shrub that grows 3- to 6- feet tall and wide. It flowers in midsummer when few other shrubs are blooming, sending up white or pink colored candles with a great fragrance. Read more about summer sweet here.

Garden Tour and TalkAs many of you know I still write free lance garden articles for a variety of magazines and publications. My recent article on Fig Growing was in the latest issue of the American Gardener Magazine. This is the magazine of the American Horticultural Society. I cover fig growing basics and give tips for growing figs in containers in the North. Read more below.

Enjoy the 4th of July holiday. Take some time to appreciate your own garden and those gardens around you. Now is a good time to start touring, looking at public gardens and private ones that are open. They often will give you ideas for your future gardens and inspire you with their beauty.

Then, come to my talk (if you’re in the NY area) on Cottage Gardening on July 10th in Warrensburgh, NY as part of their self-guided, Summer Garden Tour of private gardens. It should be a fun time

Until next time, I’ll be seeing you in the garden.

Charlie

Charlie & Sharon

 


Where to Find Charlie:(podcasts, TV and in-person)


How to Grow: Rudbeckia

RudbeckiaIt seems the summer is zipping along in our garden. I noticed some of the early Rudbeckias or black eyed Susans blooming. That’s okay with me. These perennial flower workhorses start blooming now and continue right into fall. You’ve gotta love a perennial flower that likes full sun and part shade, grows on almost any type of soil, doesn’t need much maintenance other that weeding out plants as they self sow and spread, takes drought and high humidity and is deer resistant.

RudbeckiaIf you have black eyed Susans in your garden, you might want to try a few unusual varieties to extend the flower show and add some special interest. ‘Prairie Sun’ is a beautiful selection that grows 2- to 3- feet tall with large flowers. The blooms have bright golden colored petals and a green cone. This makes ‘Prairie Sun’ shine even brighter in your garden. It flowers until early fall. ‘Goldsturm’ is a classic, yellow petaled and brown coned variety that has the added benefit of long-lived flowers. This 2- to 3-foot tall variety with extend the daisy show for weeks in your garden. If you want to add some height to your flower garden or need a tall perennial against a garage or house, try Rudbeckia maxima or the ‘Giant’ Rudbeckia. It stands 4- to 6-feet tall with golden petaled flowers on top. It’s a favorite of finches and other small birds for the seed heads. ‘Gloriosa’ rudbeckia features petals with a burnt red center on large flowers.

rudbeckiaAs you can guess, growing rudbeckias is pretty easy. They tolerate many soils, sun and growing conditions that would thwart other more tender perennials. However, you do have give them some attention. After a few years you can divide your plants and spread them around your yard. It’s a good way to grow large clumps of rudbeckia that butterflies and bees like. This also keeps them in bounds. Rudbeckias can spread and you’ll find plenty of extra seedlings in spring around the older plants. Learn to identify these babies and dig and move them in spring to a new home.

Since deer and rabbits don’t usually bother this perennial, they are good plants to put in high wildlife traffic areas and certainly in meadows. Growing rudbeckia as part of a wildflower mix gives you reliable color for years in a meadow planting. They are able to compete with weeds and grasses.

Grow rudbeckias in the garden next to Russian sage, sedum and echinacea for a nice color combination. Black eyed Susans also make great cut flowers so plant some extras just for bringing indoors for the table.
 

Go here for more on growing rudbeckia


 Meadows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 How to Grow: Blueberries
BLueberriesWe just had our first taste of blueberries. I know it’s early for our zone 5 garden, but we have a dwarf, container variety that loves to be the first producer. It makes up in earliness, what it lacks in size. We’re still harvesting strawberries and cherries, but the main crop of blueberries won’t be far behind.

If you’re looking for a shrub that gives you a low maintenance plant with bell-shaped white flowers and delicious fruit, plus has great, red, fall foliage color, go no further than the blueberry. I talk a lot about blueberries when I speak on Foodscaping or edible landscaping (based on my book).  It’s a great shrub for a foundation planting or mixing in with other perennials or low growing shrubs. Since it needs an acidic soil, grow blueberries near other low pH lovers such as azaleas, small rhododendrons, pieris and mountain laurel.

Blueberry fall foliageIf you’re growing blueberries for production, then give them their own space. That way you can treat all the soil with sulfur to get the pH down to the required 5.0. Grow the plants on well-drained, loamy soil. We tried once to grow them on clay and the plants struggled for years. If all you have is clay, raise the beds up adding a thick layer of compost and topsoil. Keep well watered, especially the first year and especially when it’s dry. Blueberries have shallow roots so they dry our quickly. We have mulched ours for years with wood chips. As the chips decompose, they create a soil rich in humus that the blueberry plants appreciate.

You’ll also notice the size of your berries is dependent on the weather. Dry conditions can result in small berries. So, if you have the water and inclination, keep the soil moist during the berry formation and growth stage for the biggest berries. Keep the plants well weeded.

low bush blueberryWe like to grow at least three different varieties of blueberries. By planting an early, mid and late season variety, we’ll have fruits for a few months. If you don’t have room for blueberries in the garden, consider container varieties. These, such as ‘Blueberry Glaze’ and ‘Peach Cobbler’ stay only 2+ feet tall and wide and produce good sized fruits. In cold climates protect the container and plants by moving them into a basement or garage.

Some gardeners even like trying to grow low bush blueberries. These produce tasty little treats on creeping plants. They take time to harvest since they are so small, but worth the effort. Low bush blueberries like a well drained soil in full sun with little competition from other plants.
 

Learn more about blueberries here

 

Watch my video on growing blueberries here

 

Watch my video on controlling birds in your blueberry patch here

Summer Sweet Shrubs
summer sweetWe’ve had a great show of spring flowering shrubs in our yard this year. Starting with forsythia to lilacs to spirea and weigela, the colors just kept coming. But now it’s all over.

That’s why I love summer sweet or Clethra shrubs. Summer sweet or pepperbush is unusual in the deciduous shrub world in that it produces flowers in mid-summer, long after all the other shrubs have passed. The plants grow up to 6 feet tall, but there are shorter selections. ‘Crystalina’ only grows 3 feet tall and wide with the same abundant flowering habit.  They make a great hedge when planted in a row or are nice foundation plants along a house. They tolerate part shade and still put on a flower show.

While the common summer sweet produces candles of white fragrant flowers, there are variations. ‘Ruby Spice’ has rose changing to pink colored blooms that stand out in the landscape.
clethra
Since summer sweet produces flowers off the new stems that form in spring, you can cut it back severely, if necessary, in late winter to shorter the size or rejuvenate the bush. Otherwise, trimming off dead, diseased or broken branches is really the only pruning that is required.

Grow summer sweet as a formal shrub in a border or along a house, in a mixed planting of shrubs and perennials or as a wildlife plant on the edge of your property. Because it flowers in part shade it can handle these various locations. Where ever it’s planted it will attract butterflies and pollinators to the flowers, so enjoy the flower show and the beautiful insects that come along with it.
 

Learn more about summer sweet here

In Our Garden: Figs For Everyone!

fresh figsThere is nothing like the taste of a fresh fig harvested off a tree and eaten immediately. It has a combination of sweetness, crunchiness and chewiness that puts dried figs to shame. But for years that’s all I had for figs. That was until I realized that I could grow figs, even in my zone 5 climate. The key was growing them in containers. Not only are containers portable, so I can move them out of harm from cold, hail and wind, I also can move then into a basement to survive the winter. Even if you live in “fig country” (zone 8 and above), growing them in containers has some advantages.

fig in potsFirst, you can move them about to protect the trees from harsh weather or pests. No one likes getting their own crop “stolen” by squirrels or birds. But also, containers are a great way to keep your figs dwarf and a manageable size. This helps with protecting them from critters, harvesting and using the plants in your landscape. Certainly many varieties are adapted to container culture such as ‘Celeste’, ‘Brown Turkey’ and ‘Hardy Chicago’. But there are also varieties that naturally stay small such as ‘Little Miss Figgy’ and ‘Petit Negra’.

The key to containerizing normal, large fig varieties is to root prune them every few years. In late winter remove them from the container, slice off up to 1/3rd of the roots. It will be okay, because figs grow roots quickly. Place the root ball back in the container filled with compost. Add some organic fertilizer and a small handful of lime to help with growth. This will keep the tree producing each year and keep the top a manageable size.

fig fruitsContainer figs generally don’t need much top pruning. Remove dead, diseased or broken branches as you see them. Trim out crowded branches in the center of the tree. This helps with air flow and reduces fig fruits rotting. Cover trees with netting if birds seem too interested in your figs. One of the major keys for my figs is to keep them well watered. If you neglect watering during fruit set, the small fig fruits will drop. Once they start maturing, you can back off watering a bit so the fruits don’t crack. Harvest when the fruits start to droop and are soft when squeezed.

I wrote a story on container figs in the May/June issue of American Gardener Magazine for the American Horticultural Association. Check it out on-line.
 

Learn more about fig growing here 

 

 

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Gardening with Charlie · 105 Pond Ln · North Ferrisburgh, VT 05473 · USA

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Charlie Nardozzi via gmail.mcsv.net 

10:10 AM (8 hours ago)
to me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gardening with Charlie · 105 Pond Ln · North Ferrisburgh, VT 05473 · USA

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Growing Vines

Learn about a wide variety of annual and perennial vines to grow including mandevilla, passion flower, trumpet vine, honeysuckle and morning glory. Includes varieties, how to grow, prune and fertilize the vines and fall and winter care.